“My period hasn’t returned” – everything you need to know about lactational amenorrhea

One of the questions our teachers often receive from new mums who have attended their classes is when a new mum should expect her first period after the birth of her baby. Unfortunately, this isn’t a question with a straight answer! Everyone really is different, and while some women report having their period as early as 5 or 6 weeks after birth, others may not see it coming back for a couple of years!“My period hasn’t returned” – everything you need to know about “lactational amenorrhea”

So let’s dig a little deeper into this topic, and we’ll explain what happens to a new mum’s body after birth.

When not breastfeeding…

Women who do not breastfeed report their period returning anything between 5 weeks and 3 months after birth. While it is possible that if a woman’s period returns this early after giving birth, she may not actually be fertile for the first few cycles, this is definitely not true for everyone! In fact, if a woman’s period returns 5 weeks after the birth of her baby, there is a possibility that she may be ovulating and be fertile 2 weeks before that, so effectively only 3 weeks after giving birth. It’s always worth remembering that because you do not know when your period will return (but you’ll be ovulating approximately 2 weeks before the first day of your period) you may want to use contraception in case you are fertile. Unless you’re planning another baby very soon, of course! Continue reading

How important is vitamin D for you and your new baby?

We all know that vitamin D is important and that sun exposure can do wonders for our vitamin D intake. But is there more to it? What does vitamin D actually do? Is it recommended that expectant mums and new babies take supplements? And if so, why? What can too little or too much vitamin D do? We have tackled some of these questions in this blog post.how important is vitamin D for mums and babies? pregnancy breastfeeding new baby BabyNatal

What is vitamin D and where do our bodies get it from?

Vitamin D helps us keep our bones, teeth, and muscles healthy. According to the NHS Choices website, in the UK from about March/April through to September, most people who regularly spend time outdoors can get enough vitamin D. This happens because our amazing bodies can create vitamin D through direct exposure of our skin (just think forearms, hands or lower legs) to the sun (without sunscreen). This is especially easier in the hours between 11am and 3pm. Short bouts of exposure of 10-15 minutes are enough for light-skinned people, but people with darker skin will need to spend longer in the sun to produce the same amount of vitamin D. For the rest of the year though, from October to March, we just can’t get enough vitamin D from sunlight alone. So if we can’t get it from exposure to the sun, where else can we get it from? Continue reading

What’s really hiding inside your baby’s wet wipes?

20161010_145107In our BabyNatal Practical Baby Care classes we discuss nappy changing, washing baby clothes, and bathing amongst other things, and one aspect that invariably always comes up is around the usage of ‘baby products’, be it soaps and shampoos, wet wipes, detergents etc. You’ll never hear us recommend one product over another one, but you’ll hear us say is that we encourage all parents and parents-to-be to make informed choices, which are right for their families, their babies and their own unique circumstances. Continue reading

Should dads always cut the umbilical cord? Shouldn’t more mums do it?

As with many other aspects of pregnancy, labour, birth and parenting, the choice around cutting the umbilical cord_quote from blog_1who should cut the umbilical cord is exactly that – a choice. Lately, however, an increasing number of expectant dads that we meet in our BabyNatal classes are telling us that they feel that they are expected to cut their baby’s umbilical cord. Continue reading

Six things you should know about your baby’s umbilical cord

In our BabyNatal Practical Baby Care classes we cover newborn appearance, and a key part of your baby’s appearance after birth (besides the fact that they are so cute, cuddly, beautiful and absolutely perfect) is that they will have some umbilical cord still attached to their tummy. Umbilical cords are not the typical thing that’s shown on TV, where babies who are meant to be newborn are in reality a few months old, so unless you’ve had a baby already or had the pleasure to be the birth partner for someone else, chances are that most of us haven’t seen one before and don’t know much about it. Continue reading

The story of one woman, one journey into motherhood and many lists!

4 -pen and paperI’d always considered myself an organized person. I was a self-professed List Queen.

I made lists in my professional life to help me keep organized and time savvy. I made lists in my private life of to-do’s so that I could cross things off and feel satisfied at my productivity. I made shopping lists, wish lists, if I won the lottery lists.  Continue reading

Why didn’t they warn me?!

vickiOur guest post today comes from the lovely Vicki.  Vicki is mummy to Alex, a little boy of 19 months, and runs For Luna, an online swimwear website with her husband, James.

There are many aspects to becoming a parent that nobody can prepare you for. You can’t describe labour and childbirth to anybody because, for one thing, it is such a personal experience – different for every woman. My experience was dreadful due to complications, and I remember asking ‘Why did no-one warn me?’, but how could they? And what good would have come from it? Anyway, as everyone knows it is all worth it in the end.

Continue reading